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From the bizarre and trivial to the serious and useful: get lost in a sea of facts and confirm or challenge your knowledge.

Interesting Facts

Average unit costs of congestion (cents/km)

This FACT indicates the average unit cost of congestion in each Australian city, measured in cents per kilometre. This indicator monetises the time needlessly spent in road traffic congestion that could otherwise be added to the revenue of the economy.

If unaddressed, the negative impact of congestion will continue to grow, adversely impacting lifestyle and broader local and national economies. According to the Bureau of Infrastructure, Transport and Regional Economics, the avoidable cost of congestion for the Australian capitals was approximately $9.4 billion in 2005. Projections show that by 2020 this cost will rise to $20.4 billion, impacting adversely on Australian productivity and economies both nationally and locally.

The city with the highest cost of congestion is Melbourne at 7.5 cents per km. The city with the lowest cost of congestion is Darwin - the city with the most bike-riders - at 1.8 cents per km.

Fertility rates (Regional)

This FACT indicates the total fertility rates in each Australian state. The total fertility rate (TFR) represents the number of children a female could expect to bear during her lifetime if she experienced current age-specific fertility rates at each stage of her reproductive life. The TFR is the sum of age-specific fertility rates (live births at each age of mother per 1,000 of the estimated female population of the same age). The state with the highest fertility rate is Tasmania at 1.95 children. The state with the lowest TFR is the Australian Capital Territory at 1.55 children.

Global Connectivity Ranking

This FACT indicates the global connectivity of Australian cities as ranked by the Globalization and World Cities (GaWC) Research Network from the year 2016. A global city (also referred to as an alpha city) is a city generally considered to be an important node in the global economic system of finance and trade. The data was interpreted and given a numbering system from 1-12, where a city that had a 'sufficiency' rating was given the value of 1, and a city with an 'alpha++' rating was given a value of 12. According to GaWC, Sydney has the highest global connectivity ranking in Australia, as an Alpha; Melbourne is next at Alpha Minus (-); then Brisbane and Perth at Beta and Adelaide rated Gamma Plus (+). Canberra is described as Sufficiency, whilst Darwin and Hobart have not qualified for a rating, and hence are assigned a value of zero.

Number of international airlines at each airport

This FACT indicates the number of international airlines that fly in and out of each major Australian city airport, from the year 2018. The data for this indicator was found by looking for a list of international airlines on each of the major airport’s websites. According to the data, Sydney has the most international airlines passing through its airport at 50, a huge disparity from Hobart, the lowest at 1. 

This FACT also appears in the Economy category.

Number of people who have completed year 12 or equivalent

This FACT indicates the number of people who have completed year 12 or equivalent in each Australian capital. While it is compulsory for children to attend school from the ages 5 to 15, and in some cases 17, it is not compulsory to complete high school after these ages. The age at which you can leave school varies from state to state. Because of this, Australia does not have very high year 12 completion rates. Many students choose to end their high school education in order to pursue career paths and options that do not require the completion of year 12 studies or their equivalent.

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